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Wood Characteristics

The following are common wood species used at Bertch. - Additional woods are also available.


Ash
Hardwood, accepts stain well. White to light tan in color, medium density, coarse texture, straight grain.


Alder
A fine-grained hardwood similar to Cherry, Birch, and Maple. Pale yellow (tan) to reddish brown in color. A soft, light wood with even texture and straight grain that accepts stain well. Characteristics include random sized tight knots and rays.


Select Alder
A fine-grained hardwood similar to Cherry, Birch, and Maple. Pale yellow (tan) to reddish brown in color. A soft, light wood with even texture and straight grain that accepts stain well. Small ramdom tight knots and rays are at times present and help to give alder its unique character.


Birch
White Birch, medium hardwood, similar to Maple but not as consistent in color as Maple, good base for solid color finishes, accepts stain unevenly; mottles. Mottling is a blotchy appearance evident due to various densities in the wood. Not recommended for darker stains. Off white color, medium density, fine texture, straight grain.


Cherry
Darkens with age at a very fast rate, pitch marks (worm holes), mineral streaks, medium hardwood, accepts stain well. Cherry is especially sensitive to light. Light will cause the wood to darken/redden significantly. Medium reddish brown color, medium density, fine texture, straight grain.


Eucalyptus
Hardwood, reddish brown in color. Relatively straight grained. Moderately heavy and very strong.


Hickory
Hardwood, mineral streaks, accepts stain evenly, known for its “wild” contrasting light and dark streaks. Light brown color, hard density, medium coarse texture, straight grain, strong, elastic, hard. Hickory has white sapwood and reddish/dark heartwood.


Mahogany
Medium reddish brown color, medium density, medium texture, predominantly straight grain, premier furniture wood.


Maple
Hardwood, fine, tight grain, looks best with light, natural, or solid color finishes, yellows slightly with age. Not recommended for darker stains. Cream color, hard density, fine texture, straight grain.


Oak
Hardwood, open grain, accepts stain well, will darken slightly with age, grain pattern very evident when a solid color finish is applied. May vary in color from light to dark with possible shades of green.


Pine (Knotty)
Very soft, sappy wood, ambers (yellows) with age, knots and knot holes, open grain, looks best with a light or natural finish, mottles with medium to dark finishes. Pale tan color, soft density, fine texture, straight grain. Variations in wood densitycoupled with sap and pitch causes variations in color during staining.


Quartersawn Oak
Very stable and has a flake figure running across the grain called a ray fleck which exhibits a beautiful grain pattern.


Red Birch
A strong fine-grained hardwood with reddish-brown color. Usually finished “Natural” to emphasize the reddish color and highlights in the grain.


Walnut
A strong fine-grained hardwood with reddish-brown color. Usually finished “Natural” to emphasize the reddish color and highlights in the grain.